Marco Maggi

  • Marco Maggi
    Turner Boxes
    (Complete Coverage on Le Corbusier (Ronchamp);
    Complete Coverage on Mies Van de Rohe (Seagram Building))
    2015/2016
    Découpes sur 500 feuilles de papier A4
    21 x 21 x 5 cm (chaque)

  • Marco Maggi
    Turner Catalogs
    2011
    Découpes sur 100 feuilles de papier A4
    30 x 23 x 4 cm (chaque)

  • Marco Maggi
    Spelling (Color) (detail), 2015
    Self adhesive alphabet on mate
    101,6 x 152,4 cm

  • Marco Maggi
    Drawing Machine (Black and White: 10 possible starting points), 2015
    Installation in situ
    158 x 271 x 18 cm

  • Marco Maggi
    Spelling North, 2016
    Cuts on paper
    34 x 34 cm

  • Marco Maggi
    Spelling South, 2016
    Cuts on paper
    34 x 34 cm

  • Marco Maggi
    Spelling East, 2016
    Cuts on paper
    34 x 34 cm

  • Marco Maggi
    Optimismo moderado, 2019
    Collage on paper
    35,5 x 27,9 cm

  • Marco Maggi
    Instant Messages, 2013
    Cut and folding over 400 envelopes
    122 x 122 cm

  • Marco Maggi
    From Newton to Macintosh, 2012
    Six Apple Macintosh variety, each in a plexiglass cube
    17 x 17 x 17 cm (each)

  • Marco Maggi
    From Newton to Macintosh (detail), 2012
    Six Apple Macintosh variety, each in a plexiglass cube
    17 x 17 x 17 cm (each)

  • Marco Maggi
    Reflejos / réflexions (yellow triptych), 2012
    Cutting on 3 x 2 A4 paper sheet
    34,5 x 26 cm (each)

  • Marco Maggi
    American Ream, 2012
    Cutting on 500 A4 paper sheet
    21,5 x 28 x 5 cm

  • Marco Maggi
    Frozen Ream, 2011
    Cutting on plexiglass prism
    21,5 x 28 x 5 cm

Through his use of simple materials manufactured for everyone’s use (such as sheets of paper, aluminum, apples, or even envelopes), the artist unfurls a topographic map of details linked to everyday life, privileging the micro over the macro, and urges us to come closer to his meticulous objects. Marco Maggi’s work is an act of resistance. It doesn’t try to be grandiloquent or shocking. Through the observation of Plexiglas cubes, which at first glance seem transparent, or seemingly white sheets, we see interlaced designs of the barren with the abundant, subtle and almost impalpable reliefs that stand out from flat surfaces, the lack of contradiction between the surface and the support, and the interdependence between the recto and the verso. These precious objects reveal to us an infinite and delicate web budding with intimate relationships and the feeling of the sublime. Acting as visual haikus – their meaning remains enigmatic – the drawings merge with the space and form a constellation of scattered forms. Delicately and tenderly, the red, yellow, or blue sheets release discreet signals that meter our pace, functioning as colored stains, shadows, or reflections. Through his use of printmaking, drawing, carving, superposition, and light, Marco Maggi always intervenes in a subtle manner in order to plunge us into the complex rhizome connecting separate universes.

Exhibitions