Dean Monogenis

  • Dean Monogenis
    Age of Sail, 2016
    Acrylique sur panneau de bois
    122 x 122 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    At the Onset, 2011
    Acrylic on wood panel
    91 x 117 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    The Fault of Egress, 2011
    Acrylic on wood panel
    76 x 102 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    White Monument, 2011
    Acrylic on wood panel
    35 x 45,5 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    Icy Diamond, 2013
    Acrylic on wood panel
    91 x 122 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    Cathedral, 2010
    Acrylic on Sintra panel
    114 x 152 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    The Nearest Faraway Place, 2011
    Acrylic on wood panel
    152 x 183 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    The Valley, 2013
    Acrylic on wood panel
    30 x 35,5 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    Forever and Then Some, 2013
    Acrylic on wood panel
    51 x 61 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    My Own Myth, 2013
    Acrylic on wood panel
    41 x 51 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    Thoughts Become This Place, 2013
    Acrylic on wood panel
    41 x 51 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    Simeon, 2015
    Acrylic on wood panel
    91 x 91 cm

  • Dean Monogenis
    Archiplex, 2015
    Acrylic on wood panel
    91 x 122

Dean Monogenis paintings evoke surroundings composed by architectural elements associated to more natural ones. He depicts unfinished buildings, colourful scaffoldings, residential buildings in the middle of rocky landscapes covered by vegetation; sometimes under a stormy sky or a colored abyss. Monogenis refers to a permanent state of transition and mutation, a fight between urbanisation and nature that resists to this invasion. Since the collapse of the twin towers, Monogenis realised that buildings are meant to live and die, the same way humans do. This idea of alteration pushes him to search for examples of transformation around him. In general, he paints on wood or plastic pannels with stencils. This mix of different painting techniques allows to bring more graphic elements to the handpainted parts. The lines, edges and textures are very important to him. To enhance contrasts, he frequently paints big zones, like skies, which give the impression that the items are embedded lacking depth. This creative process brings tension to the foreground, challenging the boundary between foreground and background. In his work, progression invites to remodel. Therefore, Monogenis frequently smoothes areas to bring them back to their original aspect. This allows him to be precise whithout compromising his spontaneity and his improvision sense.

Exhibitions